HJDS Travel Group

Yucatan Birds

by on Sep.27, 2011, under Travel

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Often, a bird watcher visiting the Yucatan gets lost in the immense wildlife. To prevent yourself from this also to help you stay guided toward searching out the birds you wish to watch, I have created a listing of the top 4 avian species to keep your eyes open for at the same time navigating the heavy forests as well as jungles of the Yucatan. So as to make it really difficult for you, most of these birds are common but some aren’t, and so don’t sit around, get into the Yucatan wildlife and also find what you went to see! Among the Yucatan wildlife, the strangest bird found is the Ocellated Turkey. The mentioned turkey has a bluish-purple head with a dark purple beak. Its body is covered in the same turquoise feathers, nonetheless they appear to dance with the light if the day almost as if they were metallic. It’s size is quite comparable to the wild American Turkey. It’s really capable to fly for its lightweight, wild Turkeys can fly unlike the usual belief that they can’t. The Ocellated Turkey in most cases can be located in the open plains or hiding among some other wildlife in the heavy brush of the Yucatan.

Yucatan Birds

Yucatan Nightjar

The wildlife in Yucatan offers bird watcher all types of opportunities. This bird is recognized as the Yucatan Nightjar. It is actually the Guatemalan version of the sparrow. It’s dark brown color spotted with bits of light brown and white disguise it totally in the forest canopies. While this bird is really common in Guatemala yet still small and very hard to locate. Whenever you do locate one, don’t make any noise or sudden movements, the same as the sparrow, they startle easily and are extremely quick.

Red Vented Woodpecker

The Red Vented Woodpecker is another bird that you can spot in the Yucatan wildlife. In contrast to its name the Red Vented Woodpecker is certainly all white with only a red cap covering the top and back of its head. It’s only 6.5 inches tall and can often be spooked away whenever given enough clatter. The top place to come across this species of Yucatan wildlife is to look on the edges of forests, in thick shrubs, and also open areas that have small clumps of trees. As with any woodpecker, it sports the classic long beak to be able to reach deep inside trees along with fruit for squirming worms as well as insects.

Cozumel Thrasher as well as the Cozumel Emerald

In the Yucatan, there are many birds to see and worth mentioning. This bird has long been on the “to-watch” list of every bird watcher that has tried his or her bird watching skills from the Yucatan wildlife. They’re the Cozumel Thrasher as well as the Cozumel Emerald. The Cozumel Thrasher is among the most vulnerable avian in the Yucatan. The most up-to-date reliable sighting was during a field study in the year 2006.

Long-Billed Thrasher

Another endangered bird specie is the Long-Billed Thrasher. Both of them have deep red to deep brown back feathers having black and white spotted breasts. Their special long tail feathers are a dead gift. While watching birds among the Yucatan wildlife, if you notice either the Long-Bill Cozumel Thrasher or even the standard Cozumel Thrasher, remember to tell the right authorities. It’s the crown jewel of Yucatan birding.

In the event that you are looking to go bird watching in the Yucatan One jungle has some good Bird Watching Tours.

Searching for a lot more travel ideas? Consider the Travel Community.

Birding in the Yucatan Peninsula is a great experience. More Travel Stories here. Also Mexico adventures for more information on adventure travel in Mexico.

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    My name is Harry Delgado and I am a full time Internet and Small Business developer and marketer. Over 30 years in the Computer systems development, programming, hardware installations and support. Currently making a living from blogs like HJDS Computer Services , HJDS Investment Group and HJDS BlogBiz. You can connect with me via social media sites at Facebook - LinkedIn - Twitter - YouTube.

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